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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Department of Health and Human Services
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration


Last Updated: 6/22/2012

SAMHSA’s Resource Center to Promote Acceptance,
Dignity and Social Inclusion Associated with
Mental Health (ADS Center)

 

2010 Campaign for Mental Health Recovery Awards for Statewide Consumer/Survivor-Operated Projects Guide

Announcement of Funding Availability for $20,000 Grants to Statewide Consumer/Survivor-Operated Organizations

Schedule

March 18, 2010     Initial announcement posted on Web site
April 1, 2010     Application period opens
April 1 - April 15, 2010     Letters of intent submitted
April 1 - April 30, 2010     Written or verbal questions answered
June 7, 2010     Applications must be postmarked
July 30, 2010     Awardees notified

We are currently accepting award applications: The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) ADS Center (Resource Center to Promote Acceptance, Dignity, and Social Inclusion Associated with Mental Health), a project of the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), is accepting applications for Campaign for Mental Health Recovery (CMHR) Awards for Statewide Consumer/Survivor-Operated Projects. CMHS is a center within SAMHSA. The SAMHSA ADS Center is operated by contract with ESI.

Background

SAMHSA's CMHR is a multiyear, national, public education campaign to educate the general public about mental health recovery. The CMHR has produced and will continue to produce television, radio, and print public service announcements (PSAs), as well as indoor, transit, Web-based, and outdoor advertising targeting the general public and specific sectors of the population. The impact of the CMHR will be measured to evaluate the dissemination of information, awareness of CMHR, utilization of CMHR resources, effectiveness of CMHR, and changes in public attitudes and behavior. More information about the Campaign is available on the CMHR Web site at http//www.whatadifference.samhsa.gov.

The purpose of these awards is to support and enhance the CMHR through the development of State outreach and community-based efforts, mental health education, and social inclusion activities. The proposed social inclusion strategy for this award cycle must include 18–25 year olds and provide a detailed plan to increase awareness of mental health and mental health recovery among general population young adults and/or among Hispanic American, African American, Asian American, and Native American populations. In addition, all applicants are encouraged, depending on access, to integrate an online social networking component or mobile communication component to increase outreach to the target audience.

In July 2005, SAMHSA published Transforming Mental Health Care in America: The Federal Action Agenda—First Steps. This report, led and developed by CMHS, contains 70 action steps to transform the mental healthcare system with the goal of recovery for individuals with mental health problems. The very first step of the action agenda calls for a national campaign to counter negative perceptions associated with mental health problems, promote social inclusion and recovery, and encourage those in need to seek assistance and support.

On December 4, 2006, SAMHSA officially launched the first round of the Campaign for Mental Health Recovery at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Television, print, and radio public awareness advertisements developed for the campaign were shown and released, and the Web site was announced. The launch generated over 100 media stories by national and local television, print, and radio media. These materials can be obtained in the Media Center section of the CMHR Web site: http://www.whatadifference.samhsa.gov/site.asp?nav=nav00&content=6_0_media.

The 2007 CMHR Awards targeted a general audience of young adults who were 18 to 25 years of age and encouraged them to support friends they knew were experiencing mental health problems. According to SAMHSA, in 2005, there were an estimated 24.6 million adults aged 18 or older who experienced serious mental health problems. This research also found that while 18 to 25 year olds have the highest prevalence of mental health problems, they are the age group with the lowest reported rate of help-seeking behaviors.

The 2008 CMHR Awards used social marketing strategies to develop radio and print PSAs to address mental health awareness among the Hispanic American, African American, Chinese American, and Native American populations. This effort was primarily concerned with the young adult community and the peers of those experiencing mental health problems.

For a short description of CMHR 2007 and 2008 State Awardees and their projects, please visit the following Web link: http://promoteacceptance.samhsa.gov/campaigns/ProgramsByType.aspx?ID=4.

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2010 CMHR Awards for Statewide Consumer/Survivor-Operated Projects

The 2010 CMHR Awards for Statewide Consumer/Survivor-Operated Projects focus on the expansion of statewide and community-based 'What a Difference a Friend Makes' efforts to further promote and expand this campaign. The proposed social inclusion strategy for this award cycle must include 18-25 year olds and provide a detailed plan to increase awareness of mental health and mental health recovery among general population young adults and/or among Hispanic American, African American, Asian American, and Native American populations. Proposals should include how applicants will incorporate one or more of the following emphases of the CMHR effort: the 'What a Difference a Friend Makes' public education campaign, the new online social networking phase of this campaign, and the new multicultural phase of this campaign. Projects should also include interpersonal contact approaches, i.e. approaches that promote direct contact with consumers, which has been shown to be the most effective approach to promoting understanding and acceptance of people who have mental health problems. All applicants are encouraged, where appropriate, to integrate an online social networking component or mobile communication component to increase outreach to the target audience.

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Award Information

Funding Mechanism: Subcontract
Anticipated Total Available Funding: $120,000
Anticipated Number of Awards: 6
Anticipated Award Amount: $20,000 in total direct costs (Indirect costs are not allowed.)
Length of Project Period: 1 year (12 months from award date)

Proposed budgets may not exceed $20,000.

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How may my organization use these funds?

SAMHSA appreciates that each applicant will have a unique perspective in developing CMHR supports for social inclusion. Successful applicants will put forth a detailed plan that shows direct linkages to the CMHR. Project activities must relate directly to the CMHR—promoting the Campaign by building on Campaign materials and activities.

Examples of project activities may include, but are not limited to the following:

Focus on Communication or Media

  • Develop or adapt a CMHR PSA with a local celebrity (e.g., Alaska used an Iditarod musher).
  • Establish a speakers' bureau.
  • Sponsor a series of documentaries with panel discussions on local TV access channels.
  • Create and conduct a social inclusion media campaign.
  • Develop PSAs with mental health consumers.
  • Organize outreach events with community-wide media and print materials, including signage, posters, postcards, and stickers.
  • Develop a Web site that includes information and materials from the CMHR (e.g., Web banners).
  • Organize media watch programs through which various individuals volunteer to contact local media when a stigmatizing view or stigmatizing language is used.

Focus on Art/Creativity

  • Sponsor art, photography, and craft shows.
  • Display art and photography exhibits.
  • Establish a drama troupe to educate the community about mental health problems.
  • Organize and host film festivals.
  • Establish film contests for young adults who create short films addressing mental health problems and stigma reduction.

Focus on Technical Assistance and Education

  • Provide technical assistance and trainings to other mental health organizations to encourage including the CMHR in their activities.
  • Organize multimedia trainings (e.g., video conferences, teleconferences) to promote collaboration and to address specific community needs.
  • Sponsor educational town hall meetings or dialogues.
  • Develop mental health consumer educator programs through which consumer educators can reach out to the community.
  • Localize CMHR efforts (e.g., PSAs) with labels specific to an organization.
  • Develop education efforts to reach college students.
  • Develop efforts for underserved populations.

Adult statewide consumer-run mental health organizations offering services for adults will be awarded subcontracts to support State and community efforts to implement the CMHR. Applications will be rated based on their proposal and their effectiveness in implementing their planned activities and in promoting social inclusion.

Funding is not available for the following:

  • Direct behavioral/mental health care
  • Any activity that violates local, State, or Federal laws or the terms of the CMHS contract with ESI
  • Payment for professional services not directly related to the proposed activities that support the CMHR
  • Costs for the creation of new organizations
  • Fundraising
  • Indirect costs/institutional overhead. (Indirect Costs are those not readily identifiable with a particular cost objective but necessary to the general operation of a nonprofit organization and the conduct of the activities it performs)
  • Subgranting or regranting (pass through)

The final selection of award recipients will be based on the evaluation score, geographic representation, the ethnic diversity of the targeted audience, project innovation, the capacity to carry out the proposed plan, and budget.

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How do I know if my organization is eligible?

Eligible applicants are statewide nonprofit agencies or organizations, 501(c)(3) entities that meet the following requirements:

  1. An applicant organization must be controlled and managed by adult mental health consumers, and it must be dedicated to transforming the mental healthcare system into a consumer- and family-driven system. Its primary focus must be activities related to adults with mental health problems.

    Please note: a consumer is defined as an individual, 18 years of age or older, who has received or is receiving mental health services.

  2. An organization must have a Board of Directors on which at least 51 percent of members are consumers.

    Please note: an applicant organization must be able to demonstrate that at least 51 percent of its Board of Directors meets the definition of an adult mental health consumer.

  3. An applicant organization must complete the "Certificate of Eligibility" indicating that the applicant meets all eligibility requirements. Applicants must also provide necessary documentation specified in the Certificate. Upon request, the applicant may be required to provide a list of Board members, in which at least 51 percent of members provide signatures to verify that they self identify as consumers.

  4. An applicant organization must be dedicated to providing mental health education, supporting social inclusion, and promoting recovery to adults with mental health problems who are 18 years or older.

  5. The statutory authority for this program prohibits the funding of for-profit agencies.

  6. Previous CMHR State Award winners may apply.

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What is expected of project awardees?

Organizations selected to receive a CMHR project award will be expected to participate in the following activities during the course of the project cycle:

  • Regularly communicate with and/or respond to communications from the CMHR Liaison and Inclusion and Mental Health Recovery Manager in order to receive technical assistance, provide updates, and discuss successes and challenges related to the project.
  • Prepare and submit to the CMHR Liaison a monthly report (template will be provided) by the 10th of each month.
  • Prepare and submit to the CMHR Liaison a final report at the end of the project cycle.

In addition, grantees will be expected to participate in three conference calls, as described below:

  • A conference call in August facilitated by the CMHR Liaison and Inclusion and Mental Health Recovery Manager for awardees to exchange information on project implementation; to network and share their proposals, ideas, and questions with other awardees; to exchange resources to assist in the success of their projects; and to discuss ideas for encouraging ongoing communication between awardees, such as a password-protected discussion board 
  • A February call facilitated by the CMHR Liaison and Inclusion and Mental Health Recovery Manager for awardees to report on the progress of their projects, challenges, and successes, as well as to exchange information, ideas, and resources
  • An April call facilitated by the CMHR Liaison and Inclusion and Mental Health Recovery Manager, open to a wider audience to hear about the awardees' successes, learn from the experience of program participants, and gain knowledge for replicating projects and possibly for competing in the 2011 awards cycle

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What is the award period?

The award period is for 12 months, beginning when the subcontract agreement with ESI is signed. (ESI is the contractor responsible for operating the SAMHSA ADS Center.)

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How will applications be reviewed?

The review process will be administered entirely by ESI and will include a review panel of mental health consumers. Each application will be evaluated according to strict adherence to the instructions provided and the following criteria (100 total points).

  1. Experience (10 points): Applicants must describe how their organizations have participated in mental health recovery and social inclusion projects or initiatives to date and discuss how their organizations promote recovery principles and practices. Social inclusion is a complex and multi-dimensional process that affects both the quality of life of individuals and the equity and cohesion of society as a whole. Social inclusion focuses on the total integration of people with mental health problems in every facet of American life. Social inclusion is evident when every individual has the resources, opportunity, and access to participate fully in all aspects of life in the community, including but not limited to equal access to economic (employment) opportunities, educational opportunities, housing, community services, legal rights, social support, and acceptance.

  2. Consumer Involvement (25points): Applicants must describe the involvement of mental health consumers in the design and writing of their proposals and the implementation of all project activities. Please indicate whether the applicant intends to hire consumers or use mental health consumers already on staff in implementing this project.

  3. Project Approach and Activities (30 points): Each applicant must describe project objectives, target audience, key activities, and a timeline of key activities. Describe in detail what makes your project innovative and/or unique to your State and/or community.

    The proposed social inclusion strategy for this award cycle must include 18–25 year olds and provide a detailed plan to increase awareness of mental health and mental health recovery among general population young adults and/or among Hispanic American, African American, Asian American, and Native American populations. Proposals should indicate how applicants will incorporate one or more of the following emphases of the CMHR effort: the ‘What a Difference a Friend Makes' public education campaign, the new online social networking phase of this campaign, and the new multicultural phase of this campaign. Projects should also include interpersonal contact approaches, i.e. approaches that promote direct contact with consumers, as these have been shown to be the most effective approach to promoting understanding and acceptance of people with mental health problems. All applicants are encouraged, where appropriate, to integrate an online social networking component or mobile communication component to increase outreach to the target audience. The proposal should also describe how the organization will incorporate and promote the 10 fundamental components of recovery (as identified in the National Consensus Statement on Recovery) to accomplish the goals of the project. In addition, please include a description of your organization's capacity to carry out your proposed activities in a culturally competent manner.

  4. SAMHSA's 10 Strategic Initiatives (10 points): The project should address at least one of SAMHSA's Strategic Initiatives, which are described below:
    1. Prevention of Substance Abuse and Mental Illness. Create prevention-prepared communities to focus on prevention of mental health problems and substance abuse—focusing first on children and youth and eventually serving individuals, families, peers, schools, businesses, and communities across the lifespan.
    2. Violence and Trauma. Reduce the behavioral health impacts of violence and trauma, and integrate trauma-informed services in prevention and treatment programs in States, in communities, and throughout the health service delivery system to address root causes of pervasive, harmful, and costly public health problems.
    3. Military Families—Active, Guard, and Veteran. Support our service men and women and their families and communities by leading efforts to ensure needed behavioral health services are accessible and outcomes are successful.
    4. Housing and Homelessness. Provide housing, and reduce the barriers that homeless persons with mental health problems and substance use disorders and their families experience when accessing programs that sustain recovery.
    5. Jobs and Economy. Use funding streams to boost community employment opportunities for people in need of jobs, including people with mental health problems and substance use disorders.
    6. Health Insurance Reform Implementation. Achieve equality with all other health conditions for the prevention and treatment of mental health problems and substance use disorders.
    7. Health Information Technology for Behavioral Health Providers. Ensure the behavioral health provider network, including prevention specialists and consumer providers, fully participates with the general healthcare delivery system in adopting health information technology.
    8. Behavioral Health Workforce—In Primary and Specialty Care Settings. Provide a coordinated approach to address workforce development issues affecting the behavioral health service delivery community.
    9. Data and Outcomes—Getting Results. Realize an integrated data strategy that informs policy and measures program impact, leading to improved outcomes for people in need of services.
    10. Public Awareness and Support. Change how mental health and substance abuse services are perceived so that people seek help for these conditions with the same urgency as any other health conditions.

  5. Project Manager/Partnerships (10 points): Identify and describe who will direct the project, and include a resume of his or her skills and experience (limited to two pages). Please list the names and contacts of statewide and community groups partnering with your organization for this project, and include detailed descriptions of the partners' roles. The number of partnerships is not limited; however, applicants must provide at least two signed letters of support that specifically outline how their partners will work with the applicant. (Letters of support are not subject to the narrative application page limit.)

  6. Project Effectiveness (10 points): Include a description of your plan to measure project effectiveness. You may use qualitative and/or quantitative methods. For example, answer how many people will you reach? How many people will you train? How many events will be held? How will you assess changes in attitudes, knowledge, or perceptions due to your CMHR project activities? Please describe how you will meet the objectives listed in the Project Approach and Activities section of your application.

  7. Budget (5 points): Provide a detailed, line-item budget and justification of the funding amount requested. A budget template is provided. Provide details on the proposed personnel and other direct costs. The budget template provides a detailed listing of what is not fundable under this award.

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How will the award be administered?

Funds will be administered by ESI. Each awardee will enter into a subcontracting agreement directly with ESI. Upon completion of the subcontract agreement with ESI, 50 percent of the award will be paid to the awardee. Twenty-five percent of the award will be paid to the awardee six months after submission of the sixth monthly report, and the final 25 percent will be paid upon completion of the project and submission of the required final report.

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What does my organization need to do to apply for this award?

The narrative package is limited to a maximum of 10 single-spaced pages (do not count the application cover sheet, project manager's resume, letters of support, certificate of eligibility or budget). Applications must be in 12-point Times New Roman font with one-inch margins all around (top, bottom, left, and right).

Applications must include all of the following documents:

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Intent to Apply
We would appreciate receiving an e-mail to cmhr-liaison@esi-dc.com indicating that you intend to submit an application. This will assist us in planning for the review process. This notice of intent does not obligate you to submit an application, nor are you required to submit an intent to apply notice.

Where do I submit my application?

You may submit your application by e-mail or mail (overnight courier or U.S. Postal Service). Applications will not be accepted by fax. If submitting an application package by e-mail, you must attach all application documents to a single e-mail to cmhr-liaison@esi-dc.com.

If submitting an application package by mail, you must provide one original and six copies of the application cover sheet and completed application narrative package, including all of the items listed above, and in the format specified above. Applications must be postmarked by the U.S. Postal Service no later than 5:00 p.m., Eastern Time, June 7, 2010. Pitney Bowes postmarks will not be accepted. Submit mailed applications to the following address:

Ruth Montag
Manager, SAMHSA ADS Center
C/O ESI
4350 East West Highway, Suite 1100
Bethesda, MD 20814

Please do not send backup materials that are not specifically requested (e.g., videotapes). They will not be reviewed and cannot be returned. Incomplete applications will not be accepted or reviewed.

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Where should I direct questions about the application packet?

You may send questions via e-mail to cmhr-liaison@esi-dc.com, or you may call 240-744-7062. Submit questions by April 30, 2010. Questions will be answered verbally and/or via e-mail on an individual basis. 

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Where can I find additional resources?

For additional information regarding CMHR efforts and other social inclusion activities, please visit these sites:

Short Descriptions of CMHR 2007 and 2008 State Awardees and Their Projects http://promoteacceptance.samhsa.gov/campaigns/ProgramsByType.aspx?ID=4

SAMHSA's Campaign for Mental Health Recovery
http://whatadifference.samhsa.gov

SAMHSA's Campaign for Mental Health Recovery
Mental Health Campaign for the African American Community
http://www.storiesthatheal.samhsa.gov

SAMHSA ADS Center
http://www.promoteacceptance.samhsa.gov

SAMHSA Grant Opportunities
http://www.samhsa.gov/grants

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Contact Information

If you have questions about the CMHR or would like to discuss any CMHR project issues, please contact the CMHR Liaison:

Ruth Montag
Manager, SAMHSA ADS Center
C/O ESI
4350 East West Highway, Suite 1100
Bethesda, MD 20814
240-744-7062
cmhr-liaison@esi-dc.com

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This Web site was developed under contract with the Office of Consumer Affairs in SAMHSA’s Center for Mental Health Services. The views, opinions, and content provided on this Web site do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of SAMHSA or HHS. The resources listed in this Web site are not all-inclusive and inclusion on this Web site does not constitute an endorsement by SAMHSA or HHS.